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Design ideology for innovative and contextual design solutions - Nitin Killawala, Group Seven Architects & Planners, Mumbai

Design ideology for innovative and contextual design solutions - Nitin Killawala, Group Seven Architects & Planners, Mumbai

Nitin Killawala, Group Seven Architects & Planners, Mumbai-

Since the  inception of his firm in 1978, Killawala’s practice has seen tremendous transformation in terms of scale of projects, end users aspirations, global design influences, construction technologies, etc. His studio shares a strong belief in teamwork and interaction of thoughts with a design ideology for innovative and contextual design solutions. His design belief lies in the fact that the benefit of good design should percolate the general masses.


The Somaiya School, Mumbai
The primary and secondary education, especially in large metro cities, such as Mumbai, is in a tremendous phase of transformation, where schools have become bigger in size, while number of students per class is reducing – thus each academic standard has many multiple divisions.


The Somiaya School is an exception on this count where maximum number of division is restricted to three per standard. This had been the prime consideration while planning the cluster of classrooms. The design imbibes good aesthetics with the use of basic colours and geometry, simple materials and quality workmanship as the prime characteristics of implementing details for the entire school.


Project Emerald – Research Centre for Sandoz, Mumbai
Perched in a quiet corner of a 26-acre existing manufacturing site replete with natural vegetation, the building is a ground-plus-one structure planned around a massive courtyard and varieties of skylights. Complex network of pipes, ducts, extractors and utilities in most of the labs necessitated parallel blocks of utility structure, which acts as a buffer between labs and external walls.

Any R&D centre while planning is identified for its labs and non-lab areas – while lab areas needs controlled movement, visually well-connected, easy and safe entry/exit points, the ‘non-lab’ areas such as offices, library, cafeteria, etc, are detached yet in close proximity. Large circulation that emerge above the lab and non-lab areas connected with corridors are all optimized and well articulated with many pauses in the form of informal breakout zones.

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